Monday, September 28, 2009

Worth watching




I wish I could show this in class--a funny, concise overview of science and civics.

10 comments:

This Brazen Teacher said...

I love this! Kinda unrelated... but as a science teacher I thought you might get a kick out of this video... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV9gRFv5Kgc

momomom said...

Hahah, funny, also not related but I just ran into this web site and thought you'd like it as a resource ... or general reading.

http://www.njpinelandsanddownjersey.com/open/

Leslie said...

Momomom--fantastic site! Thanks!

momomom said...

Oh, another brilliant blond is Marina from hotforwords.com

Kathryn J said...

Love it! I wish you could show it in your classroom too.

Blogger In Middle-earth said...

Kia ora e Michael!

Bravo Missy Goldilocks - and I agree with her!

But as with all propaganda and associated criticism, there's a real possibility of misunderstanding and misinterpretation. I doubt if the vid would be so much use, as I'm sure that many minds would take away many interpretations from it. One could be that 'Darwin' (and all the associated paraphernalia) is rubbish. That's not exactly the message I'D like to put across either.

I'd tend to put the vid aside, and leave the rest to the biology teachers.

Catchya later.

Matt said...

This site is brilliant. I'm glad I found it. I'm glad I found a teacher that kicks this much ass. 'Nuff said.

John Spencer said...

I've found that kids get satire better than people assume. Perhaps it would be misunderstood, but no worse than really misguided monkey-to-human drawings we had on our textbooks growing up. I'm probably way too comfortable with kids going through the journey of ministerpretation. Maybe it's because I teach computers and social studies, which are both riddled with paradox, bloated opinions, mystery and other dangerous elements.

Blogger In Middle-earth said...

Kia ora e John!

Yes you are right about kids. Their interpretation is often based on their naivety, and so is less likely to be tainted by preconception and familiarity with hackneyed stereotypes.

Catchya later

doyle said...

Dear everyone,

Thanks for the words. I love it when the conversation curls around without me involved.

A couple of highlights for me: wonderful links from Brazen Teacher and momomom.

And Ken, I happen to agree with you (and expected more comments like yours)--there are plenty of reasons why the video does not belong in the classroom, not the least that it might be misunderstood.

John, you hit the nail on the head--we have plenty of bad science in science classes.